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Unveiling Betiana Bradas: A Journey Through Art & Inspiration

Betiana Bradas, an Argentine visual artist, has been showcasing her works, performances, and exhibitions worldwide for many years. Her artistic journey began at a young age when she transitioned from studying Accounting in Rosario during her adolescence to pursuing a career in graphic design. This change allowed her to delve deeper into her artistic interests. Exploring her career, she began studying fine arts in Argentina, attended art workshops in different parts of the world, and pursued courses abroad in art curating, as well as contemporary art in renowned institutions such as Christie’s and Sotheby’s.



In an interview with Miami Living Magazine, Bradas shared insights into her artistic vision, inspirations, and more.


ML: How did your background in graphic design and fashion influence your artistic approach and creativity?


My background in graphic design and fashion has been pivotal in my life. Graphic design honed my skills in composition, color theory, and typography, influenced by Bauhaus figures like Paul Klee and Kandinsky. Fashion brought a fresh perspective to my art, emphasizing detail and meticulousness. It spurred me to explore new forms of expression, such as my “Layers” series, which began in 2018, focusing on manipulating fabrics to highlight the female form.

ML: Can you share some memorable insights or experiences from showcasing your art internationally?


A decade ago, I participated in the “World Art Dubai” Fair in the UAE, showcasing provocative, sensual representations of mouths and bodies. I created a series of intense red lips adorned with gloss and famous brand names, symbolizing sensuality and consumerism’s power. The Sheikh’s reaction to my work was surreal. I also performed live, using my high heels to paint a red mouth on canvas, leaving an unforgettable impression on viewers.



ML: Opening your own gallery, Casasur, in Madrid must have been a significant milestone. How has this impacted your artistic vision?


Casasur broadened my artistic horizons, fostering collaborations with local and international artists. Opening my gallery expanded my business acumen, navigating unfamiliar cultural landscapes and making decisions that enriched my skills beyond artistry. Living in Paris in 2019 and opening Casasur in 2021 immersed me further in the European art market, fostering valuable connections in the global art community.


ML: What inspired your latest exhibitions, “Portals” and “De Venir,” and what message do you aim to convey through these series?


Last year in Buenos Aires, I presented “Sintopía” and “De Venir.” “Sintopía” explored the intertwining of visual elements, while “De Venir” represented transformation and evolution towards something new. This led to my “Portals” series, symbolizing new beginnings and hope. Through my sculptures, I convey messages of transformation and resilience, believing in our ability to achieve dreams with determination.


ML: What inspired your new series of sculptures paying tribute to Lionel Messi, and what message do you hope to convey through them?


Lionel Messi’s inspiring journey motivated me deeply. Earlier this year, I created sculptures commemorating the Inter Miami vs. NOB match, capturing Messi’s career essence. Each sculpture, adorned in club colors, symbolizes Messi’s achievements and his ties to his teams. “Grand Entrance,” shining in gold, represents his majestic football career. These artworks honor Messi’s legacy and advocate for perseverance and teamwork in achieving greatness.



To learn, more please visit: www.betianabradas.com.


Follow Betiana Bradas on her online platforms

Facebook: Betiana Bradas


By ML Staff . Images courtesy of Betiana Bradas


Acknowledgments:

Elsa Montinroni, Hernan and Virginia Bradas, Gustavo Beretta, NOB Art, Pablo Fernandez Vitale, Ana Caporalini, Bradas SRL, Ricardo Segura, Anibal Devichenzo, Claudio Roncoli

Valk Gallery: Ana Stjerne, Raul Eden Modo Vuela: Gonzalo Velazquez Casasur Madrid: Tomas Valdivieso. Ph: Noe Torres, Federico Cavagni.

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